Showing posts tagged with “nieniekoto”

nieniekoto asked: Once you get this you have to say 5 things about you publicly, and then send this to 10 of your favorite followers ˘ ³˘♥

oh crumbs um okay

  1. I love plotting out fic, I just find it difficult to write most of the time, as I run out of steam quickly, and I spend ages on finding the right words and the right way to phrase it. back when i first started fandom (i’m not including that one Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles fanfic when I wrote when I was like 9) but when I was 13 and I started writing Fullmetal Alchemist fanfiction I could pump out 300 words a day and my longest fic was 13,992 words. i realise my word count was that high was because i didn’t care about the quality, i really didn’t. and now i do and it sucks sometimes because ugh writing is hard. i’m glad i’ve improved though, wouldn’t trade that for anything. 
  2. I hate lying, it makes me uncomfortable even when lying is going to help me: like a job app will say “and don’t have a certificate 3 or higher” and even though my diploma has nothing to do with the app I still feel uncomfortable with taking out my diploma because I know I have it and I avoid getting into trouble at all cost, I won’t even enter a store with a bought product that I know they sell because I don’t want to be accused of shoplifting, i mean i’ll do it if I have to but oh my gosh i feel ridiculously uncomfortable about it.
  3. I manage my money really well. it’s something i pride myself in. even though the only reason i’m so good at it is because i am so indecisive. like when i don’t have money I want all the things but when i do have money i’ll sit there and weigh how much i want the item. like when i ordered my Scott McCall Hoodie, I wanted it forever, and when I got the dollars for it I sat there going “maaaybe i don’t need it. i mean i’d use it forever. and i do really want. and it’s not too much money.” and then the conversion rates came in and it was another round of that with “am i willing to pay that much.” for a few minutes. so i manage money well. unlike my bro who spent $500 on an outfit for a con that he’s only going to wear maybe once or twice without a sweat.
  4. I love wolves. I have loved them since forever. i use to run down the school corridors howling when I was in year 6 to 8. i got quite good.
  5. my favourite chocolate treat is m&ms, while my favourite lolly is starbursts babies. and my favourite chocolate bar is peppermint crisps. while my favourite icecream is either golden gaytime or drumstick mint depending on my mood.
My Tumblr Crushes:nieniekotoscottinpantiesamorremanetourposeandsaviortylersofposeyabbiemillskicksasspremoonsyndromeelvesarebadallyricasokay my tumblr crushes did a scydia so i’m okay with that (tho it makes me sad that Tiere isn’t on there ;___; )
My Tumblr Crushes:
  1. nieniekoto
  2. scottinpanties
  3. amorremanet
  4. ourposeandsavior
  5. tylersofposey
  6. abbiemillskicksass
  7. premoonsyndrome
  8. elvesarebad
  9. allyricas

okay my tumblr crushes did a scydia so i’m okay with that (tho it makes me sad that Tiere isn’t on there ;___; )

BISTRECYAN gives me sad emotions; I can count on one hand how many times @nieniekoto has made them have happy emotions ONE HAND

ilu nie

For Nie ;; companion piece to thisI decided to draw Cyan because Bistrè isn’t complete without Cyan uwu
For Nie ;; companion piece to this
I decided to draw Cyan because Bistrè isn’t complete without Cyan uwu
For Nie ;; my precious darlingI had a bad day so I tried to draw Bistrè since he has the more soothing hair to draw uwu
For Nie ;; my precious darling
I had a bad day so I tried to draw Bistrè since he has the more soothing hair to draw uwu
catmerch:

winchestersers:

gaypee:

alollipocalypse:

neurosciencestuff:

Biofeedback-based horror game challenges players to deal with fear
While traditional horror video games seek to provide an exciting thrill, Nevermind is a biofeedback-enhanced horror game that has greater ambitions. It requires you to manage your anxiety in alarming scenarios – the more stressed you feel, the harder the game becomes. The aim, says Erin Reynolds, its creator, is for players to learn how to not let their fears get the best of them in nerve-wracking situations and hopefully carry over their gameplay-acquired skills into the real world.
A Garmin cardio chest strap akin to the ones gym-goers use to monitor their workout acts as a sensor, relaying the player’s heart rate information to the game through an ANT+ USB stick. The game calculates the player’s Heart Rate Variability (HRV), measuring the change in the duration between their heartbeats to figure out when their “fight or flight” response has kicked in and adjusts the gameplay accordingly. While Nevermind can’t zero in on specific stressful emotions like frustration or upset, it’s able to detect the intensity of the player’s feelings and gauge how deeply they feel stress at any point during the game.
Instead of having fanged horrors and hordes of zombies jump out from around corners, which might need a learning curve, the game is more subtle in inducing fear and is designed to appeal to non-gamers too. It creates a warped chaotic atmosphere where the creepiness factor is slowly dialed up, with huge screaming heads, blood-spattered doors and thrashing body bags.
Assuming the role of a newly hired Neruroprober at the Neurostalgia Institute, players boldly dive into the troubled minds of traumatized patients who are repressing their most horrific memories. To root out the cause of their suffering, players will need to solve puzzles and be willing to face a host of unimaginable terrors before the patient’s subconscious is ready to release its painful memories.
"This psychological phenomenon is based on how some people cope with severe psychological trauma in real life," Reynolds tells Gizmag. "These are individuals who experienced an event so terrible at some point in their lives that their conscious minds locked all memories of that event away completely. Although the patients can’t recall exactly what, if anything, happened to them, the repressed memories end up festering within their subconscious and create immense challenges in their attempts to live a normal life."
The sensor detects how scared or stressed the player gets as they move through the patient’s subconscious, recovering ten Polaroid photographs that each represent a distressful memory. Once all the photographs have been collected, they’ll have to differentiate the false memories from the five true ones and reconstruct the traumatizing memory. If they start to feel more fear, which the game sets out to trigger, the gameplay becomes perceptibly difficult. While some situations impact players more than others, they are all designed to push the player’s buttons.
For example, in the “car maze” section players follow the guiding sound of a blaring car horn through a twisting cave-like maze of crashed and wrecked cars full of disorienting imagery. As the player’s fear levels rise, the visuals become increasingly distorted until they are barely able to see what’s ahead of them.
"Some players become anxious over the car horn, others over the complexity of the maze, some over the imagery – there are a whole host things in this area that can rile up one’s nerves," says Reynolds. "The player needs to have a good grasp on how to calm down by this point in the game as it’s a nearly impossible challenge to escape the maze while scared or stressed."
In another scenario, the player explores a grotesque kitchen to find an ambiguous writhing mass in an oven and a giant bloodied refrigerator buzzing with flies that offers a puzzle. If the player gets rattled trying to solve the puzzle in this disturbing setting, milk starts flooding the room, pouring in from all over. Sloshing around in the waist-high milk makes it harder to move and the more anxious the player feels, the more milk floods in until it drowns them. If they are able to calm down in time the milk stops pouring in and drains out. If not, they drown and the game pulls them out of the room, returning them to the peaceful surroundings of the Institute until they feel ready again.
Making the game tougher as the player’s fear increases might seem counter-intuitive, but its developers were very clear about designing it that way. “We wanted players to become aware in a very real way of when their anxiety levels were starting to become elevated and reward them for being able to manage that anxiety on the fly,” Reynolds tells us. “We knew making the environment change so significantly that it would impact what the player was doing would get their attention.”
Developed as part of a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) thesis project within the University of Southern California’s Interactive Media and Games Division, Nevermind took about a year to build and presently exists as a “proof of concept game.” It has one level with one patient’s subconscious mind connected to a hub area that’s built to support the minds of 10 more patients. A play through takes about an hour. Reynolds plans to get a Kickstarter project going and launch the game with a variety of disturbed patients in late 2014. The team also plans to conduct thorough studies of the game’s impact on players and explore its use in therapy.
Will playing the game have us reacting to freaky situations with a Yoda-like serene gaze? Its developers hope it will help.
“Nevermind draws players in with the promise of a fun, exciting horror game that uses some spiffy new technology, but I hope it ultimately leaves them better equipped to take on the world more bravely and confidently than ever before,” Reynolds tells us. “In a way, it’s the biggest puzzle in the game – how do you solve your gut, knee-jerk reactions to unpleasant scenarios? If you can figure it out in the game, you’ll find success. If you can figure it out in life, you’ll find success there too.”

OH MAN AS A FAN OF SURVIVAL HORROR GAMES WITH GENERAL ANXIETY DISORDER WHO WANTS TO BE A THERAPIST AND ABSOLUTELY LOOOOOVES PSYCHONAUTS THIS IS EXACTLY WHAT THE DOCTOR ORDERED ITS LIKE THEY WENT INSIDE MY BRAIN AND WENT ‘YEAH LET’S MAKE A GAME JUST FOR SAMI’
I AM PROBABLY GOING TO SUCK AT IT BECAUSE YEAH MY ANXIETY LEVELS ARE OFF THE CHARTS MOST OF THE TIME BUT THIS IS STILL A GREAT THING, AND IT IS ESPECIALLY A GREAT THING IF THEY FIND OUT HOW TO IMPLIMENT IT IN A CLINICAL SETTING. THERE’S ART THERAPY, MUSIC THERAPY, PET THERAPY, DANCE THERAPY, TALK THERAPY, CAN YOU IMAGINE VIDEO GAMETHERAPY THIS IS SO EXCITING WHAT A TIME TO BE ALIVE!!!!!!!!!!!

i’m going to fuck that

no!! dont fuck the game!!

I WANT THIS SO BAD

catmerch:

winchestersers:

gaypee:

alollipocalypse:

neurosciencestuff:

Biofeedback-based horror game challenges players to deal with fear

While traditional horror video games seek to provide an exciting thrill, Nevermind is a biofeedback-enhanced horror game that has greater ambitions. It requires you to manage your anxiety in alarming scenarios – the more stressed you feel, the harder the game becomes. The aim, says Erin Reynolds, its creator, is for players to learn how to not let their fears get the best of them in nerve-wracking situations and hopefully carry over their gameplay-acquired skills into the real world.

A Garmin cardio chest strap akin to the ones gym-goers use to monitor their workout acts as a sensor, relaying the player’s heart rate information to the game through an ANT+ USB stick. The game calculates the player’s Heart Rate Variability (HRV), measuring the change in the duration between their heartbeats to figure out when their “fight or flight” response has kicked in and adjusts the gameplay accordingly. While Nevermind can’t zero in on specific stressful emotions like frustration or upset, it’s able to detect the intensity of the player’s feelings and gauge how deeply they feel stress at any point during the game.

Instead of having fanged horrors and hordes of zombies jump out from around corners, which might need a learning curve, the game is more subtle in inducing fear and is designed to appeal to non-gamers too. It creates a warped chaotic atmosphere where the creepiness factor is slowly dialed up, with huge screaming heads, blood-spattered doors and thrashing body bags.

Assuming the role of a newly hired Neruroprober at the Neurostalgia Institute, players boldly dive into the troubled minds of traumatized patients who are repressing their most horrific memories. To root out the cause of their suffering, players will need to solve puzzles and be willing to face a host of unimaginable terrors before the patient’s subconscious is ready to release its painful memories.

"This psychological phenomenon is based on how some people cope with severe psychological trauma in real life," Reynolds tells Gizmag. "These are individuals who experienced an event so terrible at some point in their lives that their conscious minds locked all memories of that event away completely. Although the patients can’t recall exactly what, if anything, happened to them, the repressed memories end up festering within their subconscious and create immense challenges in their attempts to live a normal life."

The sensor detects how scared or stressed the player gets as they move through the patient’s subconscious, recovering ten Polaroid photographs that each represent a distressful memory. Once all the photographs have been collected, they’ll have to differentiate the false memories from the five true ones and reconstruct the traumatizing memory. If they start to feel more fear, which the game sets out to trigger, the gameplay becomes perceptibly difficult. While some situations impact players more than others, they are all designed to push the player’s buttons.

For example, in the “car maze” section players follow the guiding sound of a blaring car horn through a twisting cave-like maze of crashed and wrecked cars full of disorienting imagery. As the player’s fear levels rise, the visuals become increasingly distorted until they are barely able to see what’s ahead of them.

"Some players become anxious over the car horn, others over the complexity of the maze, some over the imagery – there are a whole host things in this area that can rile up one’s nerves," says Reynolds. "The player needs to have a good grasp on how to calm down by this point in the game as it’s a nearly impossible challenge to escape the maze while scared or stressed."

In another scenario, the player explores a grotesque kitchen to find an ambiguous writhing mass in an oven and a giant bloodied refrigerator buzzing with flies that offers a puzzle. If the player gets rattled trying to solve the puzzle in this disturbing setting, milk starts flooding the room, pouring in from all over. Sloshing around in the waist-high milk makes it harder to move and the more anxious the player feels, the more milk floods in until it drowns them. If they are able to calm down in time the milk stops pouring in and drains out. If not, they drown and the game pulls them out of the room, returning them to the peaceful surroundings of the Institute until they feel ready again.

Making the game tougher as the player’s fear increases might seem counter-intuitive, but its developers were very clear about designing it that way. “We wanted players to become aware in a very real way of when their anxiety levels were starting to become elevated and reward them for being able to manage that anxiety on the fly,” Reynolds tells us. “We knew making the environment change so significantly that it would impact what the player was doing would get their attention.”

Developed as part of a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) thesis project within the University of Southern California’s Interactive Media and Games Division, Nevermind took about a year to build and presently exists as a “proof of concept game.” It has one level with one patient’s subconscious mind connected to a hub area that’s built to support the minds of 10 more patients. A play through takes about an hour. Reynolds plans to get a Kickstarter project going and launch the game with a variety of disturbed patients in late 2014. The team also plans to conduct thorough studies of the game’s impact on players and explore its use in therapy.

Will playing the game have us reacting to freaky situations with a Yoda-like serene gaze? Its developers hope it will help.

Nevermind draws players in with the promise of a fun, exciting horror game that uses some spiffy new technology, but I hope it ultimately leaves them better equipped to take on the world more bravely and confidently than ever before,” Reynolds tells us. “In a way, it’s the biggest puzzle in the game – how do you solve your gut, knee-jerk reactions to unpleasant scenarios? If you can figure it out in the game, you’ll find success. If you can figure it out in life, you’ll find success there too.”

OH MAN AS A FAN OF SURVIVAL HORROR GAMES WITH GENERAL ANXIETY DISORDER WHO WANTS TO BE A THERAPIST AND ABSOLUTELY LOOOOOVES PSYCHONAUTS THIS IS EXACTLY WHAT THE DOCTOR ORDERED ITS LIKE THEY WENT INSIDE MY BRAIN AND WENT ‘YEAH LET’S MAKE A GAME JUST FOR SAMI’

I AM PROBABLY GOING TO SUCK AT IT BECAUSE YEAH MY ANXIETY LEVELS ARE OFF THE CHARTS MOST OF THE TIME BUT THIS IS STILL A GREAT THING, AND IT IS ESPECIALLY A GREAT THING IF THEY FIND OUT HOW TO IMPLIMENT IT IN A CLINICAL SETTING. THERE’S ART THERAPY, MUSIC THERAPY, PET THERAPY, DANCE THERAPY, TALK THERAPY, CAN YOU IMAGINE VIDEO GAMETHERAPY THIS IS SO EXCITING WHAT A TIME TO BE ALIVE!!!!!!!!!!!

i’m going to fuck that

no!! dont fuck the game!!

I WANT THIS SO BAD


X-MEN FIRST CLASS + Azazel

X-MEN FIRST CLASS + Azazel

eeee good to hear! good luck bb <3

*gives you lots of tiny kisses* thaaaankyooou sweets!

jlike-lucy-in-the-sky:

shipping your own OCs and getting emotional more like

image

So I’ve signed up for the following things:
Extreme Big Bang focusing on the wonderful Scott McCall
X-Men First Class Big Bang Round 3 (well it will be my third year) with the wonderful PJ; at least it hasn’t begun but we’ve agreed to work together yup
NaNoWriMo I’m actually gonna try and write my Cops & Robbers novel this year, there was an attempted in 2011 but it flopped (I got 7,000 words and then nothing) so here’s hoping yeah? And on the plus it actually has a title LIKE A PROPER ONE AND EVERYTHING

So y’know come kick my butt into gear, for the big bangs you can catch me here
For the nanowrimo you can come be my buddy here I’m (not) pretty sure anyway.